Category Archives: claims

concluding well, part 1 – the big air problem

Big air? Well yes, I have been sporadically watching the Winter Olympics. And if you have too, you’ll know that big air is the term used to describe events where a highly skilled and very brave person takes a big … Continue reading

Posted in claims, conclusion, implications of research | Tagged , , , , , | 3 Comments

tracking the path to research claims

All researchers make claims about their work. Remember the phrase staking a claim? That’s what we are actually doing when we claim something. We are metaphorically placing a marker in a field that we are prepared to stand on, stand … Continue reading

Posted in academic writing, argument, claim, claims, evidence, revision, revision strategy, thesis, thesis revision | Tagged , , , , , | 1 Comment

you’re so vague…

It is important when writing about research to be specific. And by writing about research I mean writing about methods in a journal article, writing methods in a thesis or journal article, writing about research  design in a research bid. … Continue reading

Posted in claims, research design, results, vagueness | Tagged , , , , , | 4 Comments

managing readers’ and reviewers’ and examiners’ expectations

I started thinking about the question of managing expectations during a recent trip to France. We stayed for some time in Aix-en-Provence. We’d chosen to be there because it seemed relatively central. But we were quite interested in the city’s … Continue reading

Posted in claims, contribution, expectations, limitations | Tagged , , , , | 3 Comments

what not to do in a thesis conclusion, part one: christmas present five

The conclusion is one of the most important sections of the thesis, yet it is often done quite badly. This is not good because the conclusion is a key part of the text and thesis writers really need to spend … Continue reading

Posted in claims, conclusion, introduction, literature review, thesis | Tagged , , | 38 Comments

blank and blind spots in empirical research

It is important when writing about research to get clear about the difference between research that is inadequate and research that is partial. There are two concepts that are helpful in deciding which of these is the case. They are: … Continue reading

Posted in blank spot, blind spot, claims, Jon Wagner, knowledge production, last chapter, research project, thesis | Tagged , , , , , | 6 Comments