Tag Archives: academic writing

missing working at work?

Eighteen months of working from home. Or WFH, WTF!! as you will now hear me say. Often. I want to WAW (work at work). I’m not desperate about it yet, but I really do miss WAW. Pre pandemic, a whole … Continue reading

Posted in office, pandemic, place, time | Tagged , , , , , , | 3 Comments

“showing” and “telling” in the thesis

The thesis must show and tell your examiner that its writer is ready to be called Dr. Yep. Dr (insert your surname here.) What do I mean by show and tell? Well, even if these are not the usual definitions, … Continue reading

Posted in academic writing, audit trail, conclusion, introduction, literature reviews, methods, show and tell, thesis | Tagged , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

The up in writing

Last week I moaned about the unintended side effects of the term imposter syndrome. Maybe I’m just feeling generally a bit browned off because I also caught myself this week revisiting old irrits about the term “writing up”. It’s nostalgic … Continue reading

Posted in academic writing | Tagged , , | 4 Comments

the problem with gap talk

Gap talk. You know, the “this research fills a gap in the literature” line. Most of us have made this statement at some point in our academic life. It’s the most common starter for journal papers, proposals and theses, according … Continue reading

Posted in gap-spotting, research warrant, thesis warrant, warrant | Tagged , , , , , , | 6 Comments

make your case stronger – argue against yourself

Argument is crucial to academic writing. It’s argue argue argue all the way. Once we have identified a problem or puzzle that we think is worth researching, we then make a case for research, creating the warrant for our work. … Continue reading

Posted in academic writing, argument | Tagged , , , , | 2 Comments

make a poster – it may also help you write a paper

Academic posters. They are a thing. You can find academic posters at a lot of conferences. Ah, conferences. Remember when we had face to face conferences? Oh, that seems like a long time ago now – but when we had … Continue reading

Posted in academic writing, conference papers, drafting, poster | Tagged , , , , , | 2 Comments

Structuring and sequencing chunks of writing

Writers think about structure, a lot. They don’t necessarily tell that to their readers. That’s because writers often want their readers to focus on what’s been written, rather than how it’s been organised. But yes, there are loads of texts … Continue reading

Posted in chunking, logical structure, paragraph, structure | Tagged , , , | 1 Comment

writing a journal article – identifying “the two paper problem”

If you’re writing a journal article, you need write it so that you make one big point. Right? One unavoidable, spelled out, take home message. There may be nuancing of the point, of course. But there’s basically just the one. … Continue reading

Posted in argument, journal article, the point | Tagged , , , , | 2 Comments

lockdown writing routines – a.k.a a cheer for the humble pear

Most creative writers have their own idiosyncratic set of rituals and routines. Academic writers do too. But at least some of these practices may have had to change during WFH – working from home – during the various lockdowns. While … Continue reading

Posted in lockdown, routine, writing rituals, writing routine | Tagged , , , , | 2 Comments

meeting your readers’ expectations – a revision strategy

There are multiple ways to revise a paper. If you’re revising, you’ll find a load of strategies on this blog, just search using the key word revision. While none of these is The One Way to sort out your writing, … Continue reading

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