Author Archives: pat thomson

About pat thomson

Pat Thomson is Professor of Education in the School of Education, The University of Nottingham, UK

what does ” connect your work to an ongoing conversation” mean?

We often hear that writing about your research is, or ought to be, joining a conversation. Other people have discussed your topic before and your writing needs to connect with that conversation. And “the conversation” actually means the published literature. … Continue reading

Posted in connecting, conversation, literature reviews, literature themes, literatures paper, meta discourse | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment

familiarity and peer review

I’ve been doing some literature work. Now don’t get me wrong, I love literature work. But I am finding it all a bit same old same old right now. All the papers read the sme, even though they have different … Continue reading

Posted in familiarity, genre, mere exposure effect, peer review | Tagged , , , , , | 3 Comments

book writing – on introductions and some-we-prepared-before

I’m writing. As I guess are many of you. I’m writing another book. You may be writing a paper, a chapter, a magazine article., a graphic novel. But my writing right now is – book.  It seems no time at … Continue reading

Posted in academic book, book writing, collaboration, introduction, thesis, writing from the middle, writing together | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

concluding well – part 2. on back rows and beautiful houses

Imagine yourself in a theatre. You choose to sit in the back row. You are the author of the play to be performed, and you have crept into the stalls after the lights go down. It is opening night and … Continue reading

Posted in conclusion, text work/identity work | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

concluding well, part 1 – the big air problem

Big air? Well yes, I have been sporadically watching the Winter Olympics. And if you have too, you’ll know that big air is the term used to describe events where a highly skilled and very brave person takes a big … Continue reading

Posted in claims, conclusion, implications of research | Tagged , , , , , | 3 Comments

dislodging stuck writing

Do you have a bit of writing that is stuck? I don’t mean you can’t get any words down on the page. I mean you have some writing where you just can’t work out what to do next. You think. … Continue reading

Posted in academic writing | 1 Comment

on being lazy

I’ve been meaning to write this post all week. But I’ve not done so. And here I am on Sunday morning with the prospect of not having anything to publish, for the first time ever. I’ve sat at my desk … Continue reading

Posted in academic life, hyper performativity, laziness, performativity, resistance | Tagged , , , , | 5 Comments

Should academics do unpaid work to share their research? if so, when and how? 

This is a guest post from Dr Anna Bull, Lecturer in Education and Social Justice at the University of York and co-director of research and campaign organisation The 1752 Group.  My comments on Twitter seemed to resonate with a lot of … Continue reading

Posted in "free work", academic writing, Anna Bull, impact | Tagged , , | 5 Comments

refresh your writing ideas

Reading is key to developing your understandings of what makes good academic writing. Anthropologist Ruth Behar (2020) suggests that academic writers shouldn’t stop at the classic texts in their discipline, but also read other genres. She says We need to read poetry … Continue reading

Posted in creative writing, reading, refreshing | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

trouble finding a writing angle? try cubing

You have research results. You want to write something – a book, a chapter, a paper. You’re in a field where there is already an active conversation. You’ve done an analysis which seems to repeat what is already out there. … Continue reading

Posted in cubing, free-writing, ideas clarification, the angle | Tagged , , , , | 1 Comment