Tag Archives: claims

you’re so vague…

It is important when writing about research to be specific. And by writing about research I mean writing about methods in a journal article, writing methods in a thesis or journal article, writing about research  design in a research bid. … Continue reading

Posted in claims, research design, results, vagueness | Tagged , , , , , | 4 Comments

making authoritative claims

Compared to – let’s say journalists for argument’s sake – we academics are generally a lot less prepared to say anything for absolute certain. Why do we do this? Do we simply love complexity and being vague? Well of course … Continue reading

Posted in academic writing, authority in writing, claim, contribution, hedges | Tagged , , , | 8 Comments

managing readers’ and reviewers’ and examiners’ expectations

I started thinking about the question of managing expectations during a recent trip to France. We stayed for some time in Aix-en-Provence. We’d chosen to be there because it seemed relatively central. But we were quite interested in the city’s … Continue reading

Posted in claims, contribution, expectations, limitations | Tagged , , , , | 3 Comments

blank and blind spots in empirical research

It is important when writing about research to get clear about the difference between research that is inadequate and research that is partial. There are two concepts that are helpful in deciding which of these is the case. They are: … Continue reading

Posted in blank spot, blind spot, claims, Jon Wagner, knowledge production, last chapter, research project, thesis | Tagged , , , , , | 5 Comments