Category Archives: academic writing

unlearning who you are and what you know? starting the doctorate

No-one arrives at a doctorate as a blank slate. Everyone brings with them particular histories – we have life experiences and personal pathways which are classed, raced, gendered; work experiences and sometimes long professional careers; as well as educational histories. … Continue reading

Posted in 'mature' doctoral researcher, academic writing, identity, mature age PhD, outsider, professional doctorate, scholarly identity, starting the PhD | Tagged , , | 3 Comments

forced rest

You know all that advice which says Take a break. Turn off your email. Go somewhere you can’t connect. Well this. Except it wasn’t planned that way. Suddenly and with no warning, patter finds herself out of contact with the … Continue reading

Posted in academic writing | 3 Comments

how to talk about writing…

Everyone who talks about writing has to use language that people can relate to and understand. Of course. Duh. Sometimes this means using terms that are already in circulation – like pomodoro and shut up and write. while these terms … Continue reading

Posted in academic writing, Larry McEnerney, reader, talking writing, value | Tagged , , , | 2 Comments

a book about style and form

I read at least one book about writing every month. Because nobody sends me these for free, this means I buy at least one book about writing each month. I know you are imagining my bookshelves, but rest easy, most … Continue reading

Posted in academic writing, Amitava Kumar, form, style | Tagged , , | 7 Comments

tackling writer’s block

It’s pretty common for writers to get stuck with their writing. Most people of course find a solution of some kind. Eventually. Sometimes the stuckness goes away, apparently by itself. But sometimes the writer finds something else to work on. … Continue reading

Posted in being stuck, stuck, writer's block, writing to get unstuck | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

familiarity and peer review

I’ve been doing some literature work. Now don’t get me wrong, I love literature work. But I am finding it all a bit same old same old right now. All the papers read the sme, even though they have different … Continue reading

Posted in familiarity, genre, mere exposure effect, peer review | Tagged , , , , , | 3 Comments

dislodging stuck writing

Do you have a bit of writing that is stuck? I don’t mean you can’t get any words down on the page. I mean you have some writing where you just can’t work out what to do next. You think. … Continue reading

Posted in academic writing | 1 Comment

Should academics do unpaid work to share their research? if so, when and how? 

This is a guest post from Dr Anna Bull, Lecturer in Education and Social Justice at the University of York and co-director of research and campaign organisation The 1752 Group.  My comments on Twitter seemed to resonate with a lot of … Continue reading

Posted in "free work", academic writing, Anna Bull, impact | Tagged , , | 5 Comments

refresh your writing ideas

Reading is key to developing your understandings of what makes good academic writing. Anthropologist Ruth Behar (2020) suggests that academic writers shouldn’t stop at the classic texts in their discipline, but also read other genres. She says We need to read poetry … Continue reading

Posted in creative writing, reading, refreshing | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

revising? try a four step approach

Many people approach revising as if it is a single shot process. They tell themselves, “I’m just going to sit down now and revise my paper”. But revising and refining a text are not one activity, they are several. The … Continue reading

Posted in academic writing, communication, revision, revision strategy, supervision | Tagged , , , , | 2 Comments