Category Archives: academic writing

categories of literatures work – what’s “new” about researching now

I’m still researching. Like most of you I’m sure. Research hasn’t so much shut down as taken a peculiar turn. I’m part of a team looking at school leaders’ work during the pandemic, the support they’ve received, their wellbeing and … Continue reading

Posted in academic writing | 2 Comments

Ten! Ten! Ten!

This post is brought to you by the number ten. Ten of what, I hear you ask? Well – ten years of blogging. And 894 posts, counting this one. Not quite two posts a week for all of the ten … Continue reading

Posted in academic blogging, academic writing, blogging, blogging about blogging, sustaining blogging | Tagged , , , | 20 Comments

make your case stronger – argue against yourself

Argument is crucial to academic writing. It’s argue argue argue all the way. Once we have identified a problem or puzzle that we think is worth researching, we then make a case for research, creating the warrant for our work. … Continue reading

Posted in academic writing, argument | Tagged , , , , | 2 Comments

make a poster – it may also help you write a paper

Academic posters. They are a thing. You can find academic posters at a lot of conferences. Ah, conferences. Remember when we had face to face conferences? Oh, that seems like a long time ago now – but when we had … Continue reading

Posted in academic writing, conference papers, drafting, poster | Tagged , , , , , | 2 Comments

revising – nine steps for making meaning

In 1973 the late Donald Murray published an essay in The Writer in which he argues that writing begins when the first draft is completed. From then on, he says, the writer revises, reads and changes their words, closing in … Continue reading

Posted in academic writing, revision, revision strategy, thesis revision | Tagged , , , , | 1 Comment

use a structured abstract to help write and revise

Most journals don’t expect an abstract to be written in a particular format. But some do. They require writers to follow a particular format – a pre-structured template. These templates – structured abstracts as they are called – are specifically … Continue reading

Posted in abstracts, academic writing, conference abstract, Pat Thomson, revision, revision strategy, structured abstract, structured abstracts, thesis abstract | Tagged , , , , | 3 Comments

a first draft in five minutes a day?

This is a brief post. It’s a brief post about a brief strategy which helps you to get started on writing that feels a bit – well – a bit boring. It’s the five minutes a day strategy. Boring? Yes … Continue reading

Posted in being stuck, boring writing, crappy first draft, pomodoro, speed writing, stuck points, tiny targets, writing to get unstuck | Tagged , , , , , , | 4 Comments

working up a first draft: a twelve step strategy

If you are drafting, it is pretty easy to find a lot of advice about the benefits of free writing. Lots of people find that timed writing sprints help to generate content. Unstructured writing is useful to work out what … Continue reading

Posted in academic writing, crappy first draft, drafting, notebook, Tiny Text, writing in chunks | Tagged , , , , , | 3 Comments

setting writing goals and targets

#AcWriMo2020, like all of its predecessors, works on the assumption that giving priority to writing during this one month of November sets up, or re-sets, a regular writing habit. #AcWriMo also suggests that you set writing goals and make sure that … Continue reading

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beginning the #phd – start writing at the start

Writing, and its alter ego, reading, are the backbone of academic work. The practices that make scholarship what it is.  In the PhD there are multiple places and purposes for writing.  We often focus on the final text, the thesis, … Continue reading

Posted in Foucault, starting the PhD, writing routine, writing to learn | 1 Comment