Tag Archives: Pat Thomson

The up in writing

Last week I moaned about the unintended side effects of the term imposter syndrome. Maybe I’m just feeling generally a bit browned off because I also caught myself this week revisiting old irrits about the term “writing up”. It’s nostalgic … Continue reading

Posted in academic writing | Tagged , , | 4 Comments

feeling like an imposter? ask “what’s going on here?”

The term imposter syndrome is everywhere. People “have it”, “suffer from it” or “ have a bad case of it.”  Imposter syndrome is a term that worries me. I’ve been concerned at how it’s used for quite some time. I’m … Continue reading

Posted in academic culture, imposter syndrome, learning | Tagged , , , , , | 11 Comments

Ten! Ten! Ten!

This post is brought to you by the number ten. Ten of what, I hear you ask? Well – ten years of blogging. And 894 posts, counting this one. Not quite two posts a week for all of the ten … Continue reading

Posted in academic blogging, academic writing, blogging, blogging about blogging, sustaining blogging | Tagged , , , | 21 Comments

the problem with gap talk

Gap talk. You know, the “this research fills a gap in the literature” line. Most of us have made this statement at some point in our academic life. It’s the most common starter for journal papers, proposals and theses, according … Continue reading

Posted in gap-spotting, research warrant, thesis warrant, warrant | Tagged , , , , , , | 6 Comments

make your case stronger – argue against yourself

Argument is crucial to academic writing. It’s argue argue argue all the way. Once we have identified a problem or puzzle that we think is worth researching, we then make a case for research, creating the warrant for our work. … Continue reading

Posted in academic writing, argument | Tagged , , , , | 2 Comments

a qual. research strategy – empathy mapping

I dont write much about research methods on this blog. That’s not because I’m not interested in research methods – I’ve published three methods texts, after all – but more because I’m pretty sure people who come here mainly want … Continue reading

Posted in data, data analysis, empathy mapping, qualitative data | Tagged , , , , | 6 Comments

make a poster – it may also help you write a paper

Academic posters. They are a thing. You can find academic posters at a lot of conferences. Ah, conferences. Remember when we had face to face conferences? Oh, that seems like a long time ago now – but when we had … Continue reading

Posted in academic writing, conference papers, drafting, poster | Tagged , , , , , | 2 Comments

academic writers as readers

Many academic writers are avid readers. That’s because there is a strong connection – not causal, but surely correlated, she says hastily – between reading and writing. Reading and writing are mutually beneficial, they feed each other. I was thinking … Continue reading

Posted in readers, reading | Tagged , , | 2 Comments

concluding a paper

Conclusions can be hard. There are a few big traps that conclusion writers can fall into. In order to avoid them, try the following three things. Deep breath. It’s good to be bold. The conclusion generally requires bigging up what … Continue reading

Posted in conclusion, journal article, so what | Tagged , , , | 3 Comments

Structuring and sequencing chunks of writing

Writers think about structure, a lot. They don’t necessarily tell that to their readers. That’s because writers often want their readers to focus on what’s been written, rather than how it’s been organised. But yes, there are loads of texts … Continue reading

Posted in chunking, logical structure, paragraph, structure | Tagged , , , | 1 Comment