Tag Archives: Pat Thomson

reading groups/journal clubs are a good idea

There’s a lot written about the benefits of academic writing groups, writing rooms and writing retreats. But not so much about academic reading groups. And yet, they can be just as beneficial.  Being in a reading group puts you in … Continue reading

Posted in "outstanding" publication, conversation, learning and talking, reading, talking, talking writing | Tagged , , , , | 1 Comment

writing argument – it’s not (always) a contest

We all know the word argument. By argument, we usually mean that people have some kind of quarrel. People take opposing positions about something and then each proceeds to try to convince the other(s) that they are right. When arguments … Continue reading

Posted in argument, conversation, explanation | Tagged , , , , | 1 Comment

academic writing choices – learning from blogging

I’ve been thinking about academic writing and blogging again. I’ve been wondering what we might learn from thinking about the writing that bloggers do. Academic blogs are not all the same. They can be categorised in various ways. I’ve been … Continue reading

Posted in academic blogging, blogging, blogging about blogging, research blogging | Tagged , , , , , | 4 Comments

revise – by connecting academic reading with academic writing

How do you know what to do when you are revising your writing? Revision always involves making a judgment about your own work. You become a self-evaluator. But what criteria do you use? Art educator and philosopher Elliott Eisner (1976, … Continue reading

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2020 reflection – on book writing during the pandemic

I’m not stopping my blog over the festive season. I’m changing tack, just a bit. I’m going to write a couple or three posts which reflect on what I’ve done this year. In 2020 I published two books. One was … Continue reading

Posted in book writing, pandemic, publishing | Tagged , , , , | 3 Comments

working up a first draft: a twelve step strategy

If you are drafting, it is pretty easy to find a lot of advice about the benefits of free writing. Lots of people find that timed writing sprints help to generate content. Unstructured writing is useful to work out what … Continue reading

Posted in academic writing, crappy first draft, drafting, notebook, Tiny Text, writing in chunks | Tagged , , , , , | 3 Comments

revising like a reader

Academic writing is generally intended to be persuasive. The writer – let’s say that’s us – wants to put a proposition to the reader, and convince them that what we have presented is credible. Our writing is worth taking seriously … Continue reading

Posted in reader, revision, revision strategy | Tagged , , , | 3 Comments

plan to write – a controlling purpose

At some point in the writing process, most writers develop a plan. Some writers may already have, before they plan, chunks of text or a crappy first draft that needs to be beaten into shape. Other writers begin with the … Continue reading

Posted in argument, controlling purpose, the point, thesis, Tiny Text | Tagged , , , , , | 3 Comments

#AcWriMo2020 goals rebooted

At this past the middling point in #Acwrimo2020, it’s good to pause and think about what you have achieved so far. If you have managed to get some writing done most days, then it is worth giving yourself a metaphorical … Continue reading

Posted in acwrimo, Pat Thomson, targets | Tagged , , , , | 1 Comment

getting into writing – again

I usually don’t have a lot of trouble writing. I’m lucky I know, but my capacity to just get on with writing is also because I’ve got a lifetime writing habit. However, even the most hardy of habits can be … Continue reading

Posted in mental space, music, place, space, time | Tagged , , , , , | 6 Comments