Category Archives: early career researchers

you don’t own me- authorship and other problems

A guest post from Megan, Maximum and Dulcie McPherson. Megan, a practising artist,  has just completed her PhD – yay and congratulations – and is looking for work in Melbourne and beyond. During the week I was approached by a … Continue reading

Posted in academic writing, authorship, early career researchers | Tagged , , | 2 Comments

you expect what? hyper performativity and academic life

This is a guest post from Dr Julie Rowlands, Deakin University, Australia. Julie is concerned about problems created by institutional demands for academic hyper-performativity. Perhaps you are too.  Recently my university’s central research office promoted a workshop for PhD students seeking … Continue reading

Posted in academic life, academic writing, career, early career researchers, hyper performativity, Julie Rowlands | Tagged , , , , | 20 Comments

researching on someone else’s project – it’s a relationship

This is a guest post by Nick Hopwood and Teena Clerke from the University of Technology Sydney. Together they reflect on their separate and shared processes of researching on someone else’s projects. And yes, one of them now works for/with the other.  … Continue reading

Posted in doctoral researcher, early career researchers, emerging researchers, identity, Nick Hopwood, PI, researcher, researcher identity, Teena Clerke, Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment

surviving (and maybe even thriving) as a career contract researcher

The final and fifth post in this series on being a researcher on other people’s projects comes from Dr Simon Bailey. Simon is Research Fellow, CLAHRC Greater Manchester Alliance,  Manchester Business School.  I’m what you might call a career contract researcher. This wasn’t … Continue reading

Posted in early career researchers, research fellow, Simon Bailey, Uncategorized | Tagged , , , | 2 Comments

Finding a balance when working on somebody else’s projects

The fourth post about researching on someone else’s projects comes from Australians Dr Jess Harris (University of Newcastle & Dr Nerida Spina (QUT). In the post that prompted our contribution, Pat described some of the ethical and political issues associated with working as … Continue reading

Posted in early career researchers, emerging researchers, Jess Harris, Nerida Spina, research fellow, Uncategorized | Tagged , , , | 1 Comment

Negotiating the associate researcher role 

Sharon McCulloch is (among other things) a teaching fellow at the University of Bath, a postgraduate tutor at University College London, and an associate lecturer at Lancaster University. Her research interests are in literacy practices, as they pertain to both … Continue reading

Posted in early career researchers, research fellow, researcher, Sharon McCulloch, Uncategorized | Tagged , , | 2 Comments

Cultivating individuality as a post-doc research assistant

This is the second post on researching on other people’s projects. Emily St.Denny is a research assistant at the Public Policy Institute for Wales, based at Cardiff University, where she studies the powers and policy levers Welsh Ministers can use … Continue reading

Posted in Emily St Denny, postdoc, researcher | Tagged , , | 1 Comment